Duke Nukem Forever – Behind the Scenes

I’m currently sitting here with my PC copy of DNF, Balls of Steel edition, on my desk. I’m patiently waiting for Steam’s clock to tick over to the 10th of June, (it’s the 9th here in Australia) when the game will unlock and I’ll be able to play it. It’s currently preloading, kind of ironic given that I have the DVD right here (I don’t know how to force it to preload from the DVD, or if that’s even possible). Until tomorrow though when I finally get to play Duke Nukem Forever (and ever, and ever…) here are a few interesting bits and pieces from out of the art book that comes with DNF’s BoS edition:


– There was supposed to be a “Negaduke”, the polar opposite of duke.

– The shotgun was modelled off a real weapon that someone bought for about $300

– They played with the idea of putting a scope or something on the pistol. Then they realised it was stupid and didn’t do it.

– The Railgun was actually pre-Gearbox.

– Speaking of which, a lot of decisions were made pre-Gearbox according to this book.

– Some of the guns were redesigned entirely (or used real world counterparts) only to be replaced with updated Duke3D weapons.

– The PigCops were revised many, many times. At one point they also had runt versions.

– General Graves’ first name was Phil. Tom Hall came up with that one.

– The old miner’s name was Gus, and he had a mule. Gus shows up in one of the old trailers (2001?) and I think the mule appears too.

– The EDF were originally just police, then they turned into some sort of modern army. Now they’re like federal SWAT officers.

– Dr Proton (from Duke Nukum, aka the first Duke Nukem game) was originally in DNF. He’s still somewhat in DNF according to the book.

– Bombshell (from the old DNF trailer, the pre 2001 one) was originally supposed to have her own game.

– DNF went from the Quake 2 engine to Unreal after the devs saw it doing large outdoor environments with decent performance.

– The Quake 1 engine was dropped when 3D Realms hit the brush limit on one of their maps. They asked Tim Willits at id Software what to do. He said “stop being so creative”.

– The credits list is friggin’ MASSIVE.

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